A tribute to Team Hugo

This is the first blog (for about four months, anyway) that isn’t going to be an update on Hugo, on how he’s doing. Partly because, really, there isn’t a huge amount to say at the moment (YAY). But mostly because this blog isn’t about Hugo, or us. It’s about the people that got us through the last few months, to where we are now; it’s about Team Hugo. During this journey, and where it has taken us so far, we have met some incredible people with equally incredible talents, and we’ve been touched by the overwhelming surge of support we’ve received at every corner. I’ve not really gone too much into this in my blogs so far, just because I really think that these people are so bloody special that they deserve more than a cursory nod here and there.

So here goes.

Anyone who knows me, or who has kept up to date with the blog so far, will know how pro-NHS I’ve always been, and how fiercely protective I am of it now. That’s because it is just purely and simply a bloody wonderful thing – I absolutely love it. It doesn’t even bear thinking about where we would be right now if it didn’t exist, or if we lived somewhere else in the world. We would either be financially destitute, or we wouldn’t have been able to get Hugo the treatment he needed. But we’re not in that situation, and that is 100% because of the NHS.

Aside from the specific people I’m about to mention, there were SO many people that were part of Hugo’s care at King’s. Doctors, consultants, the ward matron and housekeepers, anesthetists and the rest of the surgical team, Clinical Nurse Specialists, intensivists, dieticians, sonographers, radiologists, pathologists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, social workers and psychologists… All do such varied roles, but each made such a huge difference to us – and they’ll continue to make a difference over Hugo’s childhood as he remains under their care. Each of them really does deserve their own tribute, but then I don’t think this post would ever end. So to all of these wonderful people, I just have to say thank you for being there; whether you were there on call in the middle of the night or as part of your routine day, you made a REAL difference, and one we will never forget.

It goes without saying, of course, that the nurses and doctors at QEQM are equally brilliant. They’ve also provided a lot of friendship and support, and shown great warmth when we’ve been on Rainbow. After being in and out like a yo-yo for the first part of the year, we then didn’t see them for over three months, and they still remembered all of us when we ended up back there. It makes our inevitable trips to hospitals less daunting, which I guess is the best we can hope for.

Nurses

It’s hard to know what to say about the nurses that we got to know at King’s. This is a team of people that work several 12 hour shifts a week, on top of their studies, courses and catch-up admin they have to do after their shift. They are dealing with very poorly children, some babies just days old, and anxious parents. Yet they do their job with such unassuming kindness, care and attention that it doesn’t really feel like they are working. For me, while I was living on Rays for nine weeks, it really felt like we were all in it together. They comforted me when I was upset, they got me tea when I was struggling, they babysat Hugo and sent me away to Ronald McDonalds for some catch up sleep when I was wandering around like a zombie. They let me have nights off with Ross to get some quality time together, and mocked us for leaving hospital to go and watch hospital dramas. They listened to my rants and ramblings, and always put up with my moods with understanding. They took the mickey out of my sleep talking. I got the girls opinions of some dodgy purchases (I accidentally ordered a very dodgy pair of hairy trainers – don’t ask). They really took the time to get to know me, Ross and Hugo; they became our friends. I still feel a bit bereft without them. They are just absolute angels, such unsung heroes, and I wholeheartedly love them all.

Melissa, Bethany, Emma and Niamh - just four of the beautiful Rays nurses
Melissa, Bethany, Emma and Niamh – just four of the beautiful Rays nurses

Transplant Coordinators

Seeing Justine and Gill (Hugo’s advocates) really became a highlight in the day when they were around. They just did so much for us over the weeks we were there. They helped to alleviate our fears, and answered our often confused and difficult questions. They always really fought for Hugo’s corner, making sure they asked the right people the right questions to get the preferred outcome. They always came for a chat and a play with Hugo before or after ward round. Both of them really helped to keep me grounded in being Hugo’s mum, and reminded me of that whenever things were starting to get the better of me. They made me laugh, often (Gill, in particular, when she pointed out my unfortunate builders bum to the passing ward round – consultants and all!), and they appreciated and encouraged my love of wine. They are just genuinely lovely, kind and funny women, and I really miss them both. I know they know just how much their friendship and support meant to all of us.

Hugo and Mickey loving the Gill and Justine cuddles
Hugo and Mickey loving the Gill (L) and Justine (R) cuddles

I had a little less contact with Fiona, Ross’s advocate, but she was equally as lovely. Hugo’s transplant wouldn’t have happened as it did without her, as she does the unenviable task of coordinating the living donor programme. I clearly remember our first conversation, where she told me that her interest was not with Hugo, but with the donor. I remember being a bit taken aback by this, but when we met and she went through it, I totally understood why she had to be so firm – she’s dealing with parents of very poorly children who, quite understandably, want (actually, need) their child to be top priority, so would often have high-running emotions (yes, even me – I know, you’d never believe it!) And she does an incredible job. They have to make sure that they’re not going to put someone’s life or health at risk unnecessarily by going through the living donor programme – yes, Hugo needed a liver, but if it would have caused harm to Ross, it would not have happened. Everything she did was to ensure that Hugo DID get his liver, and as soon as possible, but in the safest way to Ross. And then, on the day, she was there in her scrubs, in and out of the theatres, keeping me informed all day. And always with a kind smile on her face. She, like Justine and Gill, made everything so much more bearable, and we’ll always have so much to thank them all for.

Fiona and Ross at the pub
Fiona and Ross at the pub

Surgeons

I always thought that the surgeons would be among the more arrogant of the people we would encounter at hospital (I blame the TV for this impression) – surgeons have to be super confident to do their job, and get paid a fair whack to do it, so that would mean a big ego, right? No, wrong. We had two top surgeons in charge of Hugo’s transplant. Professor Nigel Heaton, who was on Ross’s side of things, and Hector (I don’t actually know his surname – that’s how informal it was) on Hugo’s. They’re both at the very top of their fields, which was reassuring as I had to put the lives of my son and my husband in their hands. What really struck me about them as I got to know them was their unassuming nature. Hector was so gentle, kind and friendly – he would always pop his head in or stop to talk to us when he was on the ward, asking after Hugo. I had many bear hugs with Hector, he was just so comforting. Prof was more reserved than Hector, less chatty, but never rude or obnoxious with it. I wanted to give him the biggest hug once the transplant was over, too, but opted for a handshake instead. I am just so incredibly in awe of what they do. At the end of the day, they saved my son’s life, and they safeguarded my husband’s. There will never be the words to express just how grateful I am that we had such wonderful, talented men doing everything in their powers to do that. It’s very humbling.

Ronald McDonald House

The Ronald McDonald house really was a haven for us while we were there. The house is just so full of warmth and a sense of compassion. Each and every time my mum, sister, Ross or I went there we were greeted with a friendly face and conversation. The facilities are just amazing; it really helped to feel like you had some semblance of a home life. There is a misconception, I’ve found, that they are funded by McDonald’s restaurants; this isn’t true. The charity boxes you’ll find at the tills go towards the charity, but they don’t get much other support from the chain. Nor are they government funded. They provided us with such wonderful – and tangible – support; there is no way that we could have afforded for anyone to be with me in London as much as they were without the house, and we are all so incredibly thankful for that.

The house that love built
Ronald McDonald – the house that love built

Work

One thing that has really struck both me and Ross during this is how incredibly lucky we are with our employers – Canterbury City Council and Holiday Extras. I’m still on maternity leave, so I’ve not had to take any time off so far, but Ross has obviously been working full time since Hugo’s diagnosis. And his work could not have been more supportive. They’ve enabled him to be there as much as he could be, encouraging him to take the time to be with me and Hugo, letting him put his family first without any worries or guilt. It sounds such a simple thing, but it’s not something that would automatically happen in this situation, and I am so grateful to them for allowing Ross to support me as much as he’s been able to. I went to see my work just before we ended up on our extended stay, as I was worried about what would happen when my maternity leave ended; I knew I wouldn’t be able to return to work when they were expecting me to, but I didn’t know what that would mean. I didn’t want to lose my job. And I haven’t. They’ve basically told me that my job will be waiting for me as soon as Hugo is well enough to go into childcare. I thought that would be the case – they work very hard at being a top employer – but it’s such a comfort to know that. We’ve got a tough few months ahead now my maternity pay has stopped (something that has been alleviated somewhat by our family), but at least I haven’t got to start again at the bottom of the pile somewhere I probably don’t want to work when the time comes.

Hugo loves a bit of HX :)
Hugo loves a bit of HX 🙂

The best mum and sister in the world

I’ll get onto the whole family in a minute. But I have to just say something about these two women. They are, without a doubt, the best friends I could have ever hoped for. They’ve been absolute towers of strength and support during all of this. Before we were in London, my mum would be here every day, doing my washing up, chores, shopping, just getting me through the day until Ross got home from work when I was struggling with it all. And then when we were in London she was there almost every week – often doing her crosswords, but there to keep me company and help in any way she could, big or small. Emily, my sister, has done so much to keep me sane during it all; making me take days or evenings out to be myself, talking to me late at night when she had work to do but knew I needed her, just always being there. They’ve somehow perfected the balance of letting me kick off or wallow when it was necessary, but also always calling me up on it when I was being unfair or unreasonable (something I know Ross will also be very grateful for!) I feel very, very luck to have had them there the whole time – they are the best mum and sister in the world, without a doubt.

Friends, family and relative strangers

We have had SO much support from friends and family, it’s been really overwhelming. The family have rallied round so much over the weeks and provided all sorts of support. They’ve driven back and forth from London to ferry either Ross, Hugo or all of us home over various discharges – sometimes at the drop of a hat. They looked after Ross when he came back from London first. They’ve provided shopping, dinners, and evenings off for the pair of us. Two of Ross’s sisters and his mum also set up a Go Fund Me page for us, to help us pay our bills in the period before I go back to work, which has given us such security and peace of mind to be able to focus on getting Hugo well, and not rushing him into nursery or childcare before his immune system is ready. They’ve given so much help, and we’re so grateful for it all.

Our friends have really kept us going. They’ve been so thoughtful and caring throughout everything, always taking the time to get in touch and ask how we all are, but what I really appreciate now that we’re home is the fact that they’re not pussyfooting around us. Many of our friends are also parents and they are, very rightly, not hiding or masking their own highs and lows for fear of upsetting us. We want to share in their joys and comfort them when it’s needed, too. Life goes on – something that is very easy to forget when you’re in the weird time bubble of hospital life – and it’s been so enjoyable coming home and slotting back into it. As much as our world totally revolves around Hugo, it’s also nice to be distracted from it and reminded about the wider world; that was something I really missed when we were up there, and something my friends have given back to me.

We’ve also developed a new and invaluable circle of support through all of this – the liver family. The mums and dads that we’ve met at King’s are the only people who REALLY get what we’ve been through with Hugo. Because they’ve been through it too. And even though they all have their own trials and tribulations to deal with, they still have the strength to offer advice and comfort (or a bottle of wine at the pub) when we really need it. They’re all incredibly inspirational and we feel like we’ve made some true friends during this journey, ones that we hope to keep for life. We’ve also had a lot of support from people we barely know, and some that we’ve never met. People who have commented on the blog, who have messaged me on Facebook, who have sent cards and presents to the hospital when we were there. Just random acts of kindness that are totally out of the blue and really lift our spirits.

A touching card and present sent to us at King's the night before Hugo's transplant
A touching card and present sent to us at King’s the night before Hugo’s transplant

It makes me feel very lucky, in amongst all the crap, to have such an incredible army of support behind us, that people are so invested in our baby boy. So to everyone reading this, whether you’ve been following Hugo’s journey so far or not, THANK YOU for being part of Team Hugo. We wouldn’t have got this far without any of you.

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9 thoughts on “A tribute to Team Hugo

  1. A wonderful blog, Polly, not only because your gratitude is full of energy, but also because the energy is so uplifting that it’s like an oasis in the horrible news thrown at us by the media. You have a gift for animating your descriptions, not only through the photos, but also because of the openness of your spirit – one which helped those like me, who have hung on every word you’ve been writing throughout these months, to believe in hope and warmth and sheer human kindness. For this it is I who must thank you. I’m sending hugs to the three of you, the biggest for Hugo.
    ps – while you’re about it, give another hug to Val from me, plse.
    maria xxxxx

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      • Hi Polly
        Have followed all your blogs which are totally brill and uplifting. Fantastic to read and hopefully a way of you & Ross to reflect and keep sane…
        This one so touching with all your tributes and yes – HURRAY for our NHS. This needs to published as antidote to all the complaints and moans… Have always thought your Mum amazing so know that – but not for me not as a mum of course! Don’t know Emily really but know she must be too. AND – who is writing about YOU and ROSS????? What amazing parents and people you are. I was impressed enough after your BIG YELLOW FRI event – let alone since!

        Think you and your Mum both met Ali earlier on in his stay in Deal? Glad you met up, as since then poor guy has had 3 less good wks when I ended up very unexpectedly on K&C neuro cos of sudden onset of a short term neuro condition.. Nothing at all like all your hospitalisation but for fit and healthy me a total shock to be in hosp for over 2 wks. I echo your comments re great staff – all ward staff fab

        Anyway – getting too long now – just a brief tribute to you, Ross and of course Hugo from me.
        Evexx
        ps. What charity supports McDonald house ?

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      • Thanks for commenting Eve. Yes, we saw Ali – was so lovely to see him after so many years. Hope to see more of him when he’s next back in the UK. I really hope you’re on the mend and fully back to health soon. The house is part of the Ronald McDonald house charity – there are houses near hospitals with children’s units all over the world. There is a link on the blog if you want to find out more. X

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  2. And you are an amazing daughter! I have been in awe of the way you and Ross have dealt with it all. I am unbelievably proud of you xxx

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  3. Thank you, Polly, for reminding me of how wonderful people can be, including yourself. This is a blog to remember! I think we should send the link to David Cameron as a reminder of how excellent and important the NHS is and how it should be looked after. I am so pleased that little Hugo is doing so well and that you are finally getting to be a family at home again.
    Love Janet xx

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  4. Lovely gratitude Polly – its also your fighting spirit that has helped you through. You should be so proud of yourself. I know I am. Love & hugs Mel xx

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